How It Works
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How It Works

The Amazing Equine Machine

The horse, like all mammals and many other animals, is an amazing system of metabolic processes that creates almost everything it needs to live, grow, heal and repair itself throughout its lifetime. Think of the horse as a complex factory that is hyper-efficient at making everything it needs: tissues like bone, muscle, tendons, hair, skin, and hoof; substances like proteins and vitamins; even chemicals like insulin, adrenaline, dopamine and glucosamine. The list . . . READ MORE

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Calcium, Phosphorus and Other Macro Minerals

Minerals required in higher amounts in a horse’s diet are often referred to as macro minerals. Although there are several, which we will review here, the most frequently discussed when it comes to horses are calcium and phosphorous. There are a variety of reasons why calcium and phosphorus are often viewed as the most important of the macro minerals . . . READ MORE

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Trace Minerals are Critical for Optimal Horse Health

Trace minerals are minerals found, and required for optimal health, in only very small amounts in a horse’s diet. Because they are generally found only in small amounts, they are often deficient when a horse is being fed hay only, with no additional supplements. It is therefore critical that these trace minerals be made available to a horse for the metabolic processes of which they are key components.

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The Simple Facts about Amino Acids and Your Horse

All protein is made up of strings of amino acids. This is why amino acids are often called the building blocks of protein. A horse uses amino acids to create the proteins in muscle, bone, blood, skin, hair, hoof and a variety of other compounds that are critical to healthy growth and maintenance . . . READ MORE

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The Importance of a Healthy Gut

 When we feed too much high-sugar or high-starch feed to a horse, the stomach and small intestine are not able to adequately absorb the carbohydrates. These carbohydrates then pass to the hind gut, where the fermentation process turns them into lactic acid. This lowers the pH of the hind gut, making it more acidic, and therefore a less desirable environment for the beneficial bacteria that are designed to break down fiber, not carbohydrates. . . READ MORE

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